Brought to you by NZCity

 | main | news | security | policing 24 Oct 2019 | crime.co.nz 
SEARCH: 
 Main NZ law and order news
Send a link to this article to a friend via email
 crime.files
  
 Murder
 Unsolved
 Sexual Crime
 White Collar
 Child Abuse
 Political & Misc.

 crime.features
  
 Crime news
 Home security
 Business security
 Security services
 Policing NZ
 NZ Parole Board
 Psychology&Law
 Kidz Korner
 Firearms in NZ

 crime.resources
  
 Prevention
 For Victims
 Drug Abuse
 Alcohol Abuse
 Legal Resources
 Crime Statistics
 Family Violence
 Support Services
 NewsLinks

 crime.co.nz
  
 HOME
 About Us
 Contribute
 Contact Us
 Feedback
 NZCity


Click here to add crime.co.nz to your NZCity Personal Start Page

Private Detectives
In a surprise development, on 20 February two ex-detectives enter the mystery of the disappearances of Olivia Hope (17) and Ben Smart (21). The friends went missing after being dropped off with a mystery man, at a yacht moored in Endeavour Inlet, off Furneaux Lodge in the early hours of New Years Day.
The news media reported that Scott Watson, the man whose sloop was seized by police in January, during the course of the investigation, had hired the ex-detectives to ‘get the story clear before there are any further developments.’

Former detective inspector and head of the Wellington CIB, Quentin Doig and ex-detective sergeant Carl Berryman were reported in The Dominion of 21 February, to be heading for Picton to conduct inquiries on behalf of Mr Watson. Messrs. Doig and Berryman disengaged from the police in 1997 and are principals in Corporate Risks, a private investigation service.

The Dominion said Mr Watson had voluntarily made comprehensive written statements on 8 and 12 January to investigating police and volunteered blood samples.

Lawyer Bruce Davidson, acting for Mr Watson, was reported as saying, “Notwithstanding Scott Watson’s cooperation with the authorities, in view of the reported statements that continue to be made about him and his sloop, Scott Watson has retained the services of solicitors, investigators and counsel to advise him in connection with his rights and i
Rob Pope gave an impression, understandably perhaps, that he was not happy with the entry of the two private detectives.
n particular, with his rights concerning the return of his property.”

Rob Pope gave an impression, understandably perhaps, that he was not happy with the entry of the two private detectives.

Quentin Doig told Radio New Zealand he intended paying Mr Pope a courtesy visit on Monday (22 February) and that he ‘did not intend to get in the way of police investigators.’ In the radio interview Mr Pope said he was surprised talk of the visit has been reported. He told Radio New Zealand he did not intend publicly discussing what he might say to Mr Doig. Nor did he want to enter into any public discussions about them, saying their presence was ‘irrelevant to the police inquiry.’

Olivia Hope’s father Gerald said the appointment did not surprise him – he had reached the stage where nothing did – but he understood it was not unusual for lawyers or barristers to use private investigators.

For more information refer to any of the 20 topics isolated for you by CrimeCo. Sequentially, Anonymous Letter is recommended.

Next related article: Forward to Anonymous LetterAnonymous Letter
Prev related article: Back to Dinghy confiscatedDinghy confiscated

Back to Operation TAM - Olivia Hope and Ben Smart Index
 

Former police enter mystery

© 2019 NZCity
For marketing opportunities contact: www.webads.co.nz